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Population and patient factors affecting emergency department attendance in London: retrospective cohort analysis of linked primary and secondary care records

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 2,532)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
77 news outlets
twitter
352 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
Title
Population and patient factors affecting emergency department attendance in London: retrospective cohort analysis of linked primary and secondary care records
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, January 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x694397
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sally A Hull, Kate Homer, Kambiz Boomla, John Robson, Mark Ashworth

Abstract

Population factors, including social deprivation and morbidity, predict the use of emergency departments (EDs). To link patient-level primary and secondary care data to determine whether the association between deprivation and ED attendance is explained by multimorbidity and other clinical factors in the GP record. Retrospective cohort study based in East London. Primary care demographic, consultation, diagnostic, and clinical data were linked with ED attendance data. GP Patient Survey (GPPS) access questions were linked to practices. Adjusted multilevel analysis for adults showed a progressive rise in ED attendance with increasing numbers of long-term conditions (LTCs). Comparing two LTCs with no conditions, the odds ratio (OR) is 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.25 to 1.31); comparing four or more conditions with no conditions, the OR is 2.55 (95% CI = 2.44 to 2.66). Increasing annual GP consultations predicted ED attendance: comparing zero with more than two consultations, the OR is 2.44 (95% CI = 2.40 to 2.48). Smoking (OR 1.30, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.32), being housebound (OR 2.01, 95% CI = 1.86 to 2.18), and age also predicted attendance. Patient-reported access scores from the GPPS were not a significant predictor. For children, younger age, male sex, white ethnicity, and higher GP consultation rates predicted attendance. Using patient-level data rather than practice-level data, the authors demonstrate that the burden of multimorbidity is the strongest clinical predictor of ED attendance, which is independently associated with social deprivation. Low use of the GP surgery is associated with low attendance at ED. Unlike other studies, the authors found that adult patient experience of GP access, reported at practice level, did not predict use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 352 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 40%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 20%
Researcher 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 60%
Unspecified 2 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 851. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2018.
All research outputs
#4,450
of 12,272,194 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#1
of 2,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#299
of 331,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#1
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,272,194 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,532 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.