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Impact of issuing longer- versus shorter- duration prescriptions: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
41 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
4 Mendeley
Title
Impact of issuing longer- versus shorter- duration prescriptions: a systematic review
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, March 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x695501
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah King, Céline Miani, Josephine Exley, Jody Larkin, Anne Kirtley, Rupert A Payne

Abstract

Long-term conditions place a substantial burden on primary care services, with drug therapy being a core aspect of clinical management. However, the ideal frequency for issuing repeat prescriptions for these medications is unknown. To examine the impact of longer-duration (2-4 months) versus shorter-duration (28-day) prescriptions. Systematic review of primary care studies. Scientific and grey literature databases were searched from inception until 21 October 2015. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials and observational studies that examined longer prescriptions (2-4 months) compared with shorter prescriptions (28 days) in patients with stable, chronic conditions being treated in primary care. Outcomes of interest were: health outcomes, adverse events, medication adherence, medication wastage, professional administration time, pharmacists' time and/or costs, patient experience, and patient out-of-pocket costs. From a search total of 24 876 records across all databases, 13 studies were eligible for review. Evidence of moderate quality from nine studies suggested that longer prescriptions are associated with increased medication adherence. Evidence from six studies suggested that longer prescriptions may increase medication waste, but results were not always statistically significant and were of very low quality. No eligible studies were identified that measured any of the other outcomes of interest, including health outcomes and adverse events. There is insufficient evidence relating to the overall impact of differing prescription lengths on clinical and health service outcomes, although studies do suggest medication adherence may improve with longer prescriptions. UK recommendations to provide shorter prescriptions are not substantiated by the current evidence base.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 25%
Other 1 25%
Student > Master 1 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 25%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 100%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2018.
All research outputs
#252,731
of 11,472,317 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#108
of 2,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,656
of 259,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#8
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,472,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,330 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.