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Child obesity cut-offs as derived from parental perceptions: cross-sectional questionnaire

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 2,747)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
35 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Child obesity cut-offs as derived from parental perceptions: cross-sectional questionnaire
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, March 2015
DOI 10.3399/bjgp15x684385
Pubmed ID
Authors

James A Black, MinHae Park, John Gregson, Catherine L Falconer, Billy White, Anthony S Kessel, Sonia Saxena, Russell M Viner, Sanjay Kinra

Abstract

Overweight children are at an increased risk of premature mortality and disease in adulthood. Parental perceptions and clinical definitions of child obesity differ, which may lessen the effectiveness of interventions to address obesity in the home setting. The extent to which parental and objective weight status cut-offs diverge has not been documented. To compare parental perceived and objectively derived assessment of underweight, healthy weight, and overweight in English children, and to identify sociodemographic characteristics that predict parental under- or overestimation of a child's weight status. Cross-sectional questionnaire completed by parents linked with objective measurement of height and weight by school nurses, in English children from five regions aged 4-5 and 10-11 years old. Parental derived cut-offs for under- and overweight were derived from a multinomial model of parental classification of their own child's weight status against school nurse measured body mass index (BMI) centile. Measured BMI centile was matched with parent classification of weight status in 2976 children. Parents become more likely to classify their children as underweight when they are at the 0.8th centile or below, and overweight at the 99.7th centile or above. Parents were more likely to underestimate a child's weight if the child was black or South Asian, male, more deprived, or the child was older. These values differ greatly from the BMI centile cut-offs for underweight (2nd centile) and overweight (85th). Clinical and parental classifications of obesity are divergent at extremes of the weight spectrum.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 63 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Other 17 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 17%
Unspecified 5 8%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Psychology 3 5%
Other 8 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 303. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2019.
All research outputs
#35,975
of 12,931,138 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#15
of 2,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#791
of 221,483 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#1
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,931,138 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,747 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,483 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.