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Delivery and impact of the NHS Health Check in the first 8 years: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Delivery and impact of the NHS Health Check in the first 8 years: a systematic review
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, June 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x697649
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam Martin, Catherine L Saunders, Emma Harte, Simon J Griffin, Calum MacLure, Jonathan Mant, Catherine Meads, Fiona M Walter, Juliet A Usher-Smith

Abstract

Since 2009, all eligible persons in England have been entitled to an NHS Health Check. Uncertainty remains about who attends, and the health-related impacts. To review quantitative evidence on coverage (the proportion of eligible individuals who attend), uptake (proportion of invitees who attend), and impact of NHS Health Checks. A systematic review and quantitative data synthesis. Included were studies or data reporting coverage or uptake and studies reporting any health-related impact that used an appropriate comparison group or before- and-after study design. Eleven databases and additional internet sources were searched to November 2016. Twenty-six observational studies and one additional dataset were included. Since 2013, 45.6% of eligible individuals have received a health check. Coverage is higher among older people, those with a family history of coronary heart disease, those living in the most deprived areas, and some ethnic minority groups. Just under half (48.2%) of those invited have taken up the invitation. Data on uptake and impact (especially regarding health-related behaviours) are limited. Uptake is higher in older people and females, but lower in those living in the most deprived areas. Attendance is associated with small increases in disease detection, decreases in modelled cardiovascular disease risk, and increased statin and antihypertensive prescribing. Published attendance, uptake, and prescribing rates are all lower than originally anticipated, and data on impact are limited, with very few studies reporting the effect of attendance on health-related behaviours. High-quality studies comparing matched attendees and non-attendees and health economic analyses are required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 38%
Researcher 4 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2019.
All research outputs
#438,161
of 13,615,200 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#225
of 2,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,995
of 268,086 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#8
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,615,200 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,086 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.