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Evolution of the general practice pharmacist’s role in England: a longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
90 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
9 Mendeley
Title
Evolution of the general practice pharmacist’s role in England: a longitudinal study
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, August 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x698849
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fay Bradley, Elizabeth Seston, Ceinwen Mannall, Chris Cutts

Abstract

To address the growing GP workforce crisis, NHS England (NHSE) launched the Clinical Pharmacists in General Practice scheme in 2015. The NHSE scheme promotes a newer, patient-facing role for pharmacists and, currently, there is little insight into the role and activities undertaken. All scheme pharmacists are enrolled on the general practice pharmacist training pathway (GPPTP). To investigate the role evolution and integration of clinical pharmacists in general practice in England. Longitudinal survey of all phase 1 GPPTP registrants working in general practice at start of (T1) and 6 months into (T2) training. An online longitudinal survey was administered to all phase 1 GPPTP registrants (n = 457) at T1 and T2, measuring their perceived knowledge, skill, and confidence, activities performed, and perceptions of practice integration, environment, and support. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were conducted. Response rates were 46% (T1) and 52% (T2); 158 participants completed both questionnaires. Perceived knowledge, skill, and confidence levels increased significantly from T1 to T2 for all areas, except for managing acute or common illness. Scope of practice increased significantly, particularly in patient-facing activities. Sharing office space with administrative staff was common and 13% of participants reported having no designated work area. Perceived integration at T2 was fairly high (median = 5 on a scale of 1-7) but GP clinical support was 'too little' according to one-third of participants. Findings show not only patient-facing role expansion, but also practice environment and support issues. Pharmacists may appreciate more GP time invested in their development. Practices need to be realistic about this support and not expect an immediate reduction in workload.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 90 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 22%
Other 2 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Other 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 33%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Chemistry 1 11%
Social Sciences 1 11%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 63. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2019.
All research outputs
#230,056
of 12,352,887 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#98
of 2,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,424
of 265,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#7
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,887 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.