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Management of endometriosis in general practice: the pathway to diagnosis

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, June 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
Title
Management of endometriosis in general practice: the pathway to diagnosis
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, June 2007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zoë Pugsley, Karen Ballard

Abstract

The prevalence of endometriosis is estimated to be around 10%. Diagnosis is through visualisation of the lesions, mostly via laparoscopy. Studies reveal that there is an average delay in the diagnosis of endometriosis of between 8 and 12 years. Little is known about the reasons for delays in diagnosis women's experiences of primary care prior to diagnosis. To investigate women's experiences of endometriosis from first presentation to diagnosis. Retrospective analysis of data collected from primary care records in four general practices. General practice in south-east England. Women with a Read Code diagnosis of endometriosis were recruited to the study. Details of consultations, investigations, and referrals related to endometriosis were recorded from the notes. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. The prevalence of endometriosis in women aged over 16 years was 1.44%. A third of women had consulted their GP six or more times before being diagnosed. Ultrasound was frequently requested by GPs, but was helpful in diagnosing endometriosis in only 10.6% of women who underwent a scan. Thirty-nine per cent of women were referred to gynaecologists two or more times before a positive diagnosis was made. The median time from first presentation with symptoms to diagnosis was 9.0 years (interquartile range = 4.5-13.5 years). Repeated consultations and negative investigations contribute to a median delay of 9.0 years before diagnosis of endometriosis. Further research into GPs' interpretation of symptoms and patients' experiences of negative investigations and consultations may lead to a more positive outcome for women with this condition.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Japan 1 3%
Unknown 30 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Student > Master 6 18%
Researcher 6 18%
Other 4 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 79%
Unspecified 2 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2018.
All research outputs
#196,942
of 9,432,623 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#82
of 2,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,533
of 250,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#4
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,432,623 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.