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Measuring morale--does practice area deprivation affect doctors' well-being?

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, September 1997
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
Title
Measuring morale--does practice area deprivation affect doctors' well-being?
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, September 1997
Pubmed ID
Authors

S Grieve

Abstract

Morale is a perennial concern in general practice and, over the years, a variety of tools have been used to examine doctors' mental well-being in a range of psychological and sociological studies. Despite perceived associations between low morale and practice area deprivation, this has not been investigated previously. To devise and apply a measure of mental well-being in general practitioners, and to use this to investigate the effect of practice area deprivation. A questionnaire was devised and piloted, then used in an anonymous postal survey of a random sample of 500 London general practitioners, with questions on demography, workload, practice characteristics, patient centredness, and practice area deprivation. A total of 334 (68%) doctors replied to the questionnaire. Of these, 45% often feel exhausted, 46% are often frustrated by trivial consultations, and a third are seriously disenchanted with work. The resulting well-being score had a normal distribution, was reproducible (test-retest reliability = 0.91), and was internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.76). Comments from respondents suggested good face validity. Low well-being was not associated with practice area deprivation, but was associated with time stress, small practices and primary care teams, and lack of patient centredness. The instrument provided a useful tool for examining doctors' well-being and the associations thereof. Well-being was not associated with practice area deprivation. Help for small primary care teams and measures to reduce time stress should help to improve morale.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 16%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Professor 1 5%
Other 6 32%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 58%
Psychology 5 26%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2020.
All research outputs
#2,220,624
of 16,908,873 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#1,039
of 3,591 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,112
of 273,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#46
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,908,873 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,591 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,252 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.