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Nursery sickness policies and their influence on prescribing for conjunctivitis: audit and questionnaire survey

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
65 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
Title
Nursery sickness policies and their influence on prescribing for conjunctivitis: audit and questionnaire survey
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, July 2016
DOI 10.3399/bjgp16x686125
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samuel Finnikin, Kate Jolly

Abstract

Acute infective conjunctivitis is common among preschool children. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that children with conjunctivitis do not need to be excluded from child care, but childcare providers are required to determine their own sickness policies and prior research suggests that children are often excluded until they are treated or have recovered. How the content of these policies impacts on prescribing decisions has not been quantified. To assess the content of childcare providers' sickness policies and determine the impact they have on clinicians' prescribing. An audit of childcare providers' sickness policies and a questionnaire among primary care clinicians. Sickness policies from childcare providers across the UK were compared with PHE guidance. Clinicians completed a questionnaire on the impact that childcare provider policies have on their decision to prescribe antibiotics to preschool children with conjunctivitis. Of 164 policies examined, 86.7% excluded children with conjunctivitis and 49.4% of policies specified a requirement for antibiotics. Two-hundred clinicians completed questionnaires and 42.6% replied that they had been influenced by childcare policies when deciding whether to prescribe antibiotics in this scenario. Furthermore, 15.4% admitted that childcare policies had been the only reason they prescribed antibiotics. Most of the childcare providers' sickness policies contain requirements that are inconsistent with PHE guidance. The requirements of childcare sickness policies are likely to be resulting in unnecessary primary care consultations and thousands of prescriptions for antibiotics with little demonstrable clinical or public health benefit.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 65 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 46%
Other 2 15%
Unspecified 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 54%
Unspecified 3 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 15%
Psychology 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 118. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2019.
All research outputs
#132,990
of 13,644,402 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#56
of 2,964 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,049
of 259,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#1
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,402 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,964 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,269 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.