↓ Skip to main content

Clinical features of bowel disease in patients aged <50 years in primary care: a large case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, March 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 3,596)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
110 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
Title
Clinical features of bowel disease in patients aged <50 years in primary care: a large case-control study
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, March 2017
DOI 10.3399/bjgp17x690425
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sally A Stapley, Greg P Rubin, Deborah Alsina, Elizabeth A Shephard, Matthew D Rutter, William T Hamilton

Abstract

Incidences of colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasing in those aged <50 years. To identify and quantify clinical features in primary care of CRC/IBD in those aged <50 years. This study considered the two conditions together and aimed to determine which younger patients, presenting in primary care with symptoms, would benefit from investigation for potentially serious colorectal disease. Matched case-control study using primary care records from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, UK. Incident cases (aged <50 years) of CRC (n = 1661) and IBD (n = 9578) diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 were each matched with up to three controls (n = 3979 CRC; n = 22 947 IBD). Odds ratios (OR) and positive predictive values (PPV) were estimated for features of CRC/IBD in the year before diagnosis. Ten features were independently associated with CRC/IBD (all P<0.001): rectal bleeding, change in bowel habit, diarrhoea, raised inflammatory markers, thrombocytosis, abdominal pain, low mean cell volume (MCV), low haemoglobin, raised white cell count, and raised hepatic enzymes. PPVs were >3% for rectal bleeding with diarrhoea, thrombocytosis, low MCV, low haemoglobin or raised inflammatory markers; for change in bowel habit with low MCV, thrombocytosis or low haemoglobin; and for diarrhoea with thrombocytosis. This study quantified the risk of serious bowel disease in symptomatic patients aged <50 years in primary care. Rectal bleeding and change in bowel habit are strongly predictive of CRC/IBD when combined with abnormal haematology. The present findings help prioritise patients for colonoscopy where the diagnosis is not immediately apparent.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 110 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 62 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Other 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 52%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Psychology 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 211. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2020.
All research outputs
#93,646
of 16,932,568 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#33
of 3,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,217
of 270,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#1
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,932,568 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,596 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,681 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.