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Reducing risk of type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: a qualitative study to explore the potential of technology in primary care

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Reducing risk of type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: a qualitative study to explore the potential of technology in primary care
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, February 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x695297
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian McMillan, Katherine Easton, Elizabeth Goyder, Brigitte Delaney, Priya Madhuvrata, Reem Abdelgalil, Caroline Mitchell

Abstract

Despite the seven-fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among females previously diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GD), annual rates of follow-up in primary care are low. There is a need to consider how to reduce the incidence of progression to T2DM among this high-risk group. To examine the views of females diagnosed with GD to ascertain how to improve primary care support postnatally, and the potential role of technology in reducing the risk of progression to T2DM. A qualitative study of a purposive sample of 27 postnatal females leaving secondary care with a recent diagnosis of GD. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 females, who had been previously diagnosed with GD, at around 6-12 weeks postnatally. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Facilitators and barriers to engaging in a healthy postnatal lifestyle were identified, the most dominant being competing demands on time. Although females were generally satisfied with the secondary care they received antenatally, they felt abandoned postnatally and were uncertain what to expect from their GP in terms of follow-up and support. Females felt postnatal care could be improved by greater clarity regarding this, and enhanced by peer support, multidisciplinary input, and subsidised facilities. Technology was seen as a potential adjunct by providing information, enabling flexible and personalised self-management, and facilitating social support. A more tailored approach for females previously diagnosed with GD may help reduce the risk of progression to T2DM. A need for future research to test the efficacy of using technology as an adjunct to current care was identified.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Unspecified 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 11 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 18%
Unspecified 5 15%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Other 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2019.
All research outputs
#784,923
of 13,384,818 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#427
of 2,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,516
of 269,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#17
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,882 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,218 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.