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Prevalence of treatment-resistant hypertension after considering pseudo-resistance and morbidity: a cross-sectional study in Irish primary care

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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1 Mendeley
Title
Prevalence of treatment-resistant hypertension after considering pseudo-resistance and morbidity: a cross-sectional study in Irish primary care
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, May 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x696221
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Hayes, Monica Casey, Liam G Glynn, Gerard J Molloy, Hannah Durand, Eoin O’Brien, Eamon Dolan, John Newell, Andrew W Murphy

Abstract

To confirm treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH), ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) must exclude white-coat hypertension (WCH), three or more medications should be prescribed at the optimal doses tolerated, and non-adherence and lifestyle should be examined. Most previous studies have not adequately considered pseudo-resistance and merely provide an apparent TRH (aTRH) prevalence figure. To conduct a cross-sectional study of the prevalence of aTRH in general practice, and then consider pseudo-resistance and morbidity. With support, 16 practices ran an anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) drug search, identifying patients on any possible hypertensive medications, and then a search of individual patients' electronic records took place. ABPM was used to rule out WCH. The World Health Organization-defined daily dosing guidelines determined adequate dosing. Adherence was defined as whether patients requested nine or more repeat monthly prescriptions within the past year. Sixteen practices participated (n = 50 172), and 646 patients had aTRH. Dosing was adequate in 19% of patients, 80% were adherent to medications, as defined by prescription refill, and 43% had ever had an ABPM. Using a BP cut-off of 140/90 mmHg, the prevalence of aTRH was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.0 to 10.0). Consideration of pseudo-resistance further reduced prevalence rates to 3% (95% CI = 3.0 to 4.0). Reviewing individual patient records results in a lower estimate of prevalence of TRH than has been previously reported. Further consideration for individual patients of pseudo-resistance additionally lowers these estimates, and may be all that is required for management in the vast majority of cases.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 1 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 1 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2019.
All research outputs
#694,007
of 13,343,384 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#371
of 2,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,616
of 269,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#17
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,343,384 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,878 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,018 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.