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Hypertension referrals from community pharmacy to general practice: multivariate logistic regression analysis of 131 419 patients

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
46 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
3 Mendeley
Title
Hypertension referrals from community pharmacy to general practice: multivariate logistic regression analysis of 131 419 patients
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, July 2018
DOI 10.3399/bjgp18x697925
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ali Albasri, Suman Prinjha, Richard J McManus, James P Sheppard

Abstract

The burden of hypertension in primary care is high, and alternative models of care, such as pharmacist management, have shown promise. However, data describing outcomes from routine consultations between pharmacists and patients with hypertension are lacking. To identify factors associated with referral of patients from pharmacies to general practice within the first 2 weeks of starting a new antihypertensive medication. Multivariate logistic regression conducted on data from community pharmacies in England. Data were obtained from the New Medicine Service between 2011 and 2012. Analyses were conducted on 131 419 patients. In all, 15 predictors were included in the model, grouped into three categories: patient-reported factors, demographic factors, and medication-related factors. Mean patient age was 65 years (±13 years), and 85% of patients were of white ethnicity. A total of 5895 (4.5%) patients were referred by a pharmacist to a GP within the first 2 weeks of starting a new antihypertensive medication. Patients reporting side effects (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 11.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 10.85 to 12.41) were most likely to be referred. Prescriptions for alpha-blockers were associated with referral (adjusted OR 1.28, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.47), whereas patients receiving angiotensin-II receptor blockers were less likely to be referred (adjusted OR 0.89, 95% CI = 0.80 to 0.99). Most patients were followed up by pharmacists without the need for referral. Patient-reported side effects, medication-related concerns, and the medication class prescribed influenced referral. These data are reassuring, in that additional pharmacist involvement does not increase medical workload appreciably, and support further development of pharmacist-led hypertension interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 67%
Student > Postgraduate 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 67%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2018.
All research outputs
#244,917
of 12,265,937 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#103
of 2,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,496
of 255,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#4
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,265,937 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,980 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.